Jobs Too Small or Too Big For a Contractor

Jobs Too Small or Too Big For a Contractor

Most contractors would probably like to stand by the statement that “no job is too big or too small”. For the most part, it’s probably true. The last thing you want to do is scare away potential clients or make others think that you can’t handle the really big projects. However, the fact is that it’s really difficult to excel at both the big and the small.

At one end of the spectrum, you could commit to a small job such as replacing a knob on a kitchen cabinet, for example. Granted, not many people would hire a contractor for such a thing, but it’s not outside the realm of possibility. Would such a job be cost-effective? Sure, it would be easy and completed rather quickly. But would it be worth the cost of time and fuel? How much could you reasonably charge for such a job? On the other hand, it would be an opportunity to earn good faith with a new client; opening a door for future business. Using that logic, you could essentially break even, justified with the possibility of cultivating future work. For some contractors, these small, seemingly insignificant jobs are a way for them to maintain a relationship with customers that they’ve already worked with. It would make sense for them to take the time and replace that knob, while checking in with an old client, possibly discussing new projects. So, it would seem that jobs too small for a contractor can be used in a positive way.

 Jobs too big, however, can have an adverse effect on how your company looks in the eyes of future clients. When looking to hire a contractor, nobody wants to call a reference and learn that XYZ Company was not able to finish the job. It’s important for your company to know its limitations before taking on any work. Developing relationships with subcontractors can be an invaluable way for your company to be more flexible when larger jobs become available. That way, your company can take on a job that is more than your current crew can handle, while not having to hire more employees. This requires careful planning and a solid idea of what work needs to be done. There is a big difference in not having enough people and resources to do the job and not having enough knowledge or time to complete it.

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